Shabbat Challah Bread (with Video)

4.18 stars average

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The BEST challah bread recipe you’ll find, I’ll show you step-by-step how to make my Grandmother’s famous six-strand challah bread, perfect for the Jewish Sabbath or weekend French toast.

Homemade Challah

This challah bread recipe hails from my Ema Ljuba, my Bubbe on my dad’s side, who is the matriarch of the Jewish side of my family. She spends most of her time in Israel now so we don’t get to see her as often as we’d like, but every time I bake her challah bread I am transported to her kitchen in Berkeley, CA where I learned how to make this irresistible recipe.

Liz Jessie Anne Ljuba

Recently my Ema Ljuba has been in town and my boys ask to see her almost every day. She has that sort of lasting impact on children, and adults! Effervescent, charismatic, joyful and always smiling from ear to ear, Ema Ljuba is the most magical grandmother in the world, and that wonder translates to her food. You can taste the love!

Homemade Baked Challah

All about Challah Bread

Challah bread originates in Eastern Europe and is part of Ashkenazi Jewish cuisine. It is typically braided in 4 or 6 strands and eaten on ceremonial occasions such as the Jewish Shabbat (sundown Friday), and major Jewish holidays like Rosh Hashanah (the Jewish new year). The texture and consistency of challah bread is similar to brioche due to the high number of eggs in the recipe. Light, fluffy and eggy, leftovers make the ultimate French toast or bread pudding! If you’ve never baked homemade bread before, I urge you to give this fool-proof recipe a shot. Believe me, if I’m baking bread (with yeast!), I can assure you anyone can do it.

How to make a six-strand braided challah bread

Adding Sugar to Yeast for Challah

To get started, dissolve yeast in warm water in a small bowl or liquid glass measuring cup with 1 tablespoon sugar and set aside.

Yeast Growing for Challah

Note: You’ll want to use a large enough bowl as this mixture will start to grow as the yeast activates.

Adding Flour to Stand Mixer

Then in a separate large bowl or stand-mixer base, whisk together flour, sugar and salt.

Adding Yeast and Sugar to Challah

Slowly add your beaten eggs and the water with dissolved yeast and sugar to the large bowl of flour.

Kneading Challah in Stand Mixer

Next, pour in the oil or melted butter and mix well with a wooden spoon or with low to medium speed. If dough doesn’t start coming together, add a bit more flour, a couple tablespoons at a time, until it pulls away from the bowl. You want the dough to be sticky though.

Kneading Challah Dough

Once the entire mass sticks together, turn out onto a floured surface and knead by hand for about 5 minutes, adding in that last cup of flour as needed to form a smooth, pliable, glossy ball. This is a great time to get out any aggression!

Putting Challah in Bowl to Rise

Then drizzle a large bowl with vegetable oil (canola oil works too) and place dough into bowl flipping it over to make sure it is covered with the oil. This will prevent it from sticking. Cover with a towel and let dough rise at room temperature until doubled in size.

Dividing Challah Dough to Braid

Once the dough has doubled in size, this is the fun part: punch down with a fist and dump onto a lightly floured surface. Knead one or two more times before dividing the dough in half to begin forming two braided loaves.

Separating Challah Dough into Pieces to Braid

From there, you will divide each half into either 3 strands (or 4 or 6 depending on how intricate you want your loaf to be braided.)

Rolling Out Challah Braids

Then take your 3 (or 4 or 6) pieces of dough and roll them out into strands.

Step Two Six Strand Challah Braid

Now that the strands have been rolled out, it’s time to begin braiding. Similar to weaving a pie crust, you’ll want to weave each strand over and under the next one.

Finished Braid of Challah Bread

If you’re a visual learner like I am, check out this step-by-step video guide I created to braiding challah bread. Once you’ve finished braiding the challah, place each loaf on a greased large baking sheet (or one lined with a silicone baking mat), cover with a dry towel and let rise a second time.

Brushing Challah with Egg

Finally, pre-heat oven to 350 degrees then brush each loaf with a beaten egg.

Adding Sesame Seeds to Challah

If you’d like to add a topping, this is the time to sprinkle with sesame seeds, poppy seeds, or sparkling sugar.

Baking Challah in Oven

Place both pans in the oven and bake the challah bread for about 30 minutes or until bread is golden brown on the surface.

The Best Jewish Challah Recipe

Let cool and then enjoy your Shabbat Challah Bread!

Ingredients and Substitutions

  • All Purpose Flour: The high gluten content and light, fluffy consistency of all purpose flour is essential to the perfect challah bread recipe. I don’t recommend substituting any other type of flour for this recipe.
  • Dry Active Yeast: The secret to challah dough that rises into a tall, beautiful loaf is using fresh active dry yeast. I recommend storing in the refrigerator in between uses to extend the life of the yeast.
  • Sugar: White sugar adds the ideal subtle sweetness to this brioche-like bread. I wouldn’t substitute with any other sweetener.
  • Eggs: The brioche-like texture and density of this bread are due to the high number of eggs in the recipe. This is what separates challah bread from traditional sandwich bread.
  • Butter or Oil: We love using butter in our challah bread but oil works just as fine. If you’re avoiding dairy, I would use oil otherwise go for butter.
  • Toppings: Before baking, sprinkle the challah with your preferred topping for additional crunch and texture. Great options include sesame seeds, sparkling sugar, poppy seeds or everything seasoning.
Shabbat Challah Bread Recipe

Baking tips and time savers

One HUGE baking tip: admittedly, I don’t love the giant mess that baking bread can create in the kitchen. Turns out, neither does my Aunt Sabrina! The solution? All of the dough kneading can be done in a stand mixer with a dough hook! We all use and love the classic KitchenAid stand mixer so if you don’t have one, you should certainly think about adding it to your holiday wish list.

Frequently asked questions:

Why is sugar used in Challah bread?

Sugar aids in the proofing of the yeast so it is an essential ingredient in this recipe. I don’t recommend using any alternative sweetener.

How long do you let the dough rise?

The dough typically takes two hours to rise during each proof. I recommend letting it sit in a well-oiled bowl in room temperature with a towel or plastic wrap placed on top.

What makes challah bread different?

Challah bread, if made traditionally, is pareve and kosher. It doesn’t use any dairy or meat. No milk or butter is usually used in challah! It also uses a lot of yeast compared to other breads, but that adds to the fluffy and light texture!

Liz Holding Challah Bread

Whether you are Jewish or not, everyone can enjoy my grandma’s delicious Shabbat Challah Bread, and I urge you to give it a try!

No forks required.

Homemade Challah

Shabbat Challah Bread (With Video)

4.18 stars average
This recipe is a tasty fool-proof recipe that involves no oil for your Jewish Sabbath and is easy to make! From my Ema Ljuba.
PREP: 4 hours
COOK: 30 minutes
TOTAL: 4 hours 30 minutes
Pin
Servings2 loaves

Recipe Video

Ingredients
 

  • 1 ½ cups to 2 cups warm water
  • 3 tablespoons dry activated yeast
  • ½ cup plus 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 6 cups plus 1 cup all purpose flour
  • 1 tablespoon salt
  • 4 large eggs (beaten)
  • ½ cup oil or melted butter
  • poppy seeds or sesame seeds for topping
  • 1 beaten egg

Instructions
 

  • In a small bowl, dissolve yeast with 1 tablespoon sugar in warm water; set aside.
  • In a separate large bowl, whisk together 6 cups flour, 1/2 cup sugar and salt.
  • Add beaten eggs and the water with dissolved yeast and sugar to the large bowl of flour.
  • Stir in oil or melted butter and mix well with a wooden spoon. Once the entire mass sticks together turn out onto a floured surface and knead for about 5 minutes, adding in that last cup of flour as needed to form a smooth, pliable glossy mass. Alternatively, this can be done in a stand mixer with a dough hook. Note: If dough isn't coming together, add more flour, a couple tablespoons at a time, until it pulls away from the bowl. You want the dough to be sticky though.
  • Oil a large bowl then place dough into bowl flipping it over to make sure it is covered with the oil. Cover with a towel and let dough rise until doubled in bulk.
  • Punch down, knead one or two times and then divide dough in half.
  • Divide each half into either 3 strands (or 4 or 6 depending on how intricate your loaf braid will be.)
  • Place each braided loaf on a greased large baking sheet (cook spray works well), cover with a dry towel and let rise a second time until loaves are double in size.
  • Pre-heat oven to 350 degrees. Brush each loaf with a beaten egg, sprinkle poppy seeds or sesame seeds if you wish.
  • Bake for about 30 minutes or until bread is golden brown on the surface.

Last Step:

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Nutrition

Calories: 167kcalCarbohydrates: 26.9gProtein: 4.5gFat: 4.5gSaturated Fat: 2.5gPolyunsaturated Fat: 2gCholesterol: 48mgSodium: 303mgFiber: 0.6gSugar: 5.2g
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106 responses to “Shabbat Challah Bread (with Video)”

  1. Beth D Avatar
    Beth D

    Hi Liz, gonna try this on a wing and a prayer but how Would I half the recipe if it’s possible. Just found your site and it’s so precise and easy to follow..love it
    Thx Beth

    1. Liz DellaCroce Avatar
      Liz DellaCroce

      Hi Beth! Just halve everything otherwise make two and freeze a loaf for later! :) Enjoy!

  2. Nikki Gladd Avatar
    Nikki Gladd

    Beautiful new photos! I bet it’s super tasty and the smell it’s fabulous!

    1. Liz DellaCroce Avatar
      Liz DellaCroce

      Thank you babe!!! It’s so good I hope you try it some time. Happy Friday!

  3. Ellen Feibel Avatar
    Ellen Feibel

    Can you take this recipe and use it to make the ROUND loaves traditional to the High Holidays?

    1. Liz DellaCroce Avatar
      Liz DellaCroce

      Yes absolutely!! Enjoy!

  4. Corry Oosterhouse Avatar
    Corry Oosterhouse

    Hi Liz–I’m so glad you posted this recipe again! I had pinned it on your Pinterest board back when you posted it the first time and had forgotten all about it!!? I need to make this for our next church potluck, they’ll love it!! Thanks!!?

    1. Liz DellaCroce Avatar
      Liz DellaCroce

      Yay I hope you love it Corry!! It’s SO Good!!

  5. Brad Avatar
    Brad

    How long do you let the dough rise for?

    1. Liz DellaCroce Avatar
      Liz DellaCroce

      It’s until it doubles so it depends on the temperature in your room but usually 2 hours works!

      1. Ana Avatar
        Ana

        Do you let the dough rise for two hours after braiding too?

        1. Liz DellaCroce Avatar
          Liz DellaCroce

          I have done it both ways and it turns out good either way. :)

  6. Vanesa Avatar
    Vanesa

    Hi!
    Is 3 TABLESPOONS correct on the yeast?
    That seems like a lot?
    Just checking before I make this!!
    It looks fabulous!
    Thank you!

    1. Liz DellaCroce Avatar
      Liz DellaCroce

      Yes it is – this makes two large loaves!

  7. Patsy Avatar
    Patsy

    Question? The recipe for the bread says to let it rise once before braiding and once after braided. But, the braiding instructions say to make sure it has raised twice BEFORE braiding. Please clarify. Thank you.

    1. Liz DellaCroce Avatar
      Liz DellaCroce

      My family only lets it rise once before braiding and once after braiding. I’m sure every family does it a bit differently though!

  8. Joann Avatar
    Joann

    I love challah bread and am super ecstatic to finally be able to make it at home! I’ve made this recipe 4x already and it’s been a hit every single time! Thank you for sharing such an amazing tradition to your reader.

    1. Liz DellaCroce Avatar
      Liz DellaCroce

      Oh I’m so glad you love this Joann!!

  9. Susan Avatar
    Susan

    Even though I am half Jewish, I’ve never had Challah. (My father’s family didn’t want anyone to know they were Jewish, and my parents didn’t think their kids needed to know, so I didn’t find out until I was 22!). I don’t bake bread much any more, but this really sounds like it would be worth trying. I’ll be doing my kneading by hand – as I’ve always done it. I don’t mind cleaning up the mess and it’s much easier than finding space for an appliance I would rarely use…

    1. Liz DellaCroce Avatar
      Liz DellaCroce

      Oh my gosh that is hilarious!!! I urge you to try it at least once in your life Susan!!! It’s really a great experience, especially doing it on Friday in honor of the Sabbath. It’s just a great reminder to slow down.

  10. Marcela Avatar
    Marcela

    Hi! I’ve always wanted to make challah bread but I gathered the courage until today thanks to your beautiful bread and amazing recipe! And it was AWESOME! Thank you for sharing your family traditions and recipes. Your family looks wonderful ☺️

    1. Liz DellaCroce Avatar
      Liz DellaCroce

      Oh I’m so thrilled you made it Marcela!!! Enjoy the tradition!!